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Recent Blog Posts in September 2010

September 20, 2010
  Smoke on Mac hands on training
Posted By Max Burgess
I took part in Autodesk's offer of free hands on training for Smoke on Mac at this years IBC. It is a great way of showcasing the software that has always looked a little daunting for Avid or Final Cut Pro users. Now that the price is significantly decreased, their demographic has changed as well, and this is a good example of trying to reach their new market.

About 5 workstations were set up running Smoke on Mac, all facing a projector on which the tutor leads you through a couple of projects to show you some keying, tracking and 3D text all through a speaker system and headphones which are essential to overcome the din of hall 7.

It proved to be just the right amount to understand a little more of how Smoke works and how it could be useful. I use Avid DS on a daily basis and grow ever more frustrated with Avid's disinterest of the product and lack of major releases at every broadcast event. With every month that I get closer to deciding whether to stick with DS or jump ship to Smoke, I am afraid to say I lean towards the latter.

Smoke's tracker is fantastic. It's keyer is effortless. It has true 3D compositing and the ability to import 3D models, adding lighting and textures. It is everything I want Avid DS to be, just with a strange interface.

My DS has a stay of execution while I wait for Smoke to play nicely in an Avid Unity environment (it can only handle the HD flavor of Avid codec's DNxHD - not the SD MXF) and I hope that with a cheaper software price point and possibly more sales, Avid might once again see the reason to invest in the RandD of the product. From my part it has until NAB next year, else it is back to compositor school for me!
Continue reading "Smoke on Mac hands on training" »

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September 20, 2010
  Post people in camera halls
Posted By Max Burgess
Once upon a time in the land of Post Production there were simple format choices. When I started to work as an edit assistant, there was only Digi-Beta (maybe some old Beta-SP's kicking around somewhere) and occasionally some Panasonic formats. These days we need to consider a whole host of file-based formats, especially as they all seem to require a slightly different workflow.

This is why I am seeing more and more post production people walking around the camera halls at IBC. It is now as important to stay abreast of the happenings in Hall 7 (where most of the post vendors are located) as it is halls 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 (camera and other production equipment). Knowing what is happening with the cameras always gives you an idea of what to expect in a job and how to deal with it.

This year the Arri Alexa was quite prominent, in its bid to reclaim some ground lost to the Red camera. Speaking of which, those clever people at Red again managed to generate hype without even having a stand at IBC. Red camera's could be seen at most stands and Ted (the leader of the revolution!) was seen a few times brandishing the much anticipated Epic camera.

Canon seems to have pulled a march on Sony with the XF 105 and 100 hand-held HD cameras that shoot at 50mbs and are BBC approved for acquisition, which trumps the EX range that is still struggling for broadcast approval while they only shoot 35mbs. Expect to see the 4:2:2 MPEG2 MXF media coming to an editing system near you soon.
Continue reading "Post people in camera halls" »

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September 20, 2010
  Everyone going software based?
Posted By Max Burgess
The trend is now definitely underway for software solutions of the tools we know and love. Avid have been playing with a software DS for a few years which has culminated with version 10.5 only being available as software for $10,000, announced at IBC this year.

Smoke on Mac is now in it's second version (2011) available for $15,000 and with Blackmagic's acquisition of DaVinci, they are now offering the grading software Resolve for only $825 (and no there aren't any missing zero's there). This is a company making grading systems that once ruled all others and would cost the same as a three bedroom house, now available, all in one box, for $825!!

What has caused this trend towards low cost software solutions? It might be that customers have been discovering for the last few years that these high-end post manufacturers were offering hardware that they either bought from another manufacturer and rebadged or were making video boards that weren't quite as good as third parties like AJA or Blackmagic.

With budgets going south year after year, paying less for a system would be appealing to any facility owner and these software based systems do appear to be cheaper, although not drastically. If you spec a system to run Avid DS or Smoke on Mac and want them to perform as well as they did as hardware solutions, don't expect to be paying less than $30,000.
Continue reading "Everyone going software based?" »

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September 20, 2010
  Avid's web-based editing
Posted By Max Burgess
A colleague of mine has been talking about editing online for years. Sitting behind my fully featured Media Composer watching examples of limited and slow online editing has never really got me excited. What I saw on Avid's stand this year at IBC did.

Avid were showing a technology preview of their Web-based editing software. There is still much to be decided with this product but essentially low res proxies are loaded up to a cloud and then from any machine, as long as it has Flash player, users can log in, view and edit the footage in an interface much resembling Media Composer.

Many different features were shown, such as auto-updates back to the craft editor with comments and notes when the Web-cut sequence is opened up in a fully featured hardware edit station. Even an iPhone application for viewing and making notes as well as basic edit changes was available. Keep an eye out for an advanced iPad version!

So what might this mean? The possibilities are endless and productivity could go through the roof. But fellow editors, a word of warning... when you are sitting at home, relaxing, don't be surprised to get the odd phone call from a producer or director asking if you can make a quick change to the edit you were working on earlier in the day!

Check out the same preview at this year's NAB here..... http://fp.avid.com/fpcache/podcasts/events/NAB/EventsRewind_2010-04-12_Web-Based-Editing-NAB.m4v
Continue reading "Avid's web-based editing" »

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September 20, 2010
  Talking for Avid
Posted By Max Burgess
I had the honor to do a presentation for Avid at IBC this year and travelled to Amsterdam with a head full of facts and quips as well as the anticipation (and nerves) of a 14 year old boy who's band was about to play in front of school assembly for the first time. LIttle did I know that my performance for Avid, talking about the new features of Media Composer 5, would be in front of 600+ Final Cut Pro fanatics at the Final Cut Pro Users Group Supermeet 2010. Now substitute the hall full of school children for hall full of Simon Cowells (Hello Mr Anderson - Matrix style!)

I might be exaggerating a little bit, The user group guys were a great bunch and as a Final Cut and Avid editor it wasn't the horror show I was expecting. My Avid co-presenter Michael Krulik did a great job of getting them laughing and thankfully there were no Avid crashes!

So, I hear you ask, why was Avid presenting at the Supermeet? Avid have done a great job at listening to the customers in the last couple of years and implementing some of the requests that have come from that. With Avid Media Access or AMA they are able to offer features that Final Cut users have always used in an argument on the merit of FCP over Avid.

Media Composer can now accommodate an editor which ever way he likes to store and use their media. The smart tool is another example of features that have been available in FCP (as well as Avid DS) but have now found their way to Media Composer?

Will this turn more Final Cut Pro editors to Avid? Maybe? With competitive pricing for the software, educational establishments now have more options and with the more students leaving school with Media Composer in their bag of experience, that can only be good for Avid.

More interestingly is what Apple's plan for Final Cut Pro is? Like many of their products since the astronomical success of the iPhone and the iOS, Final Cut pro news has been a little thin on the ground. They have made no secret of this, even stating that the full operating system OSX would see less major updates as has been the custom in the last 5 years, and why should they? It wouldn't take an accountant to realize they make far more money from the iPhone.

It seems Avid has now picked up the ball they dropped a while back, and with Media Composer firmly seated back on the Mac platform I wonder how much we really need Final Cut Pro, after all Apple bought it because the relationship between them and Avid got so bad that Media Composer became a windows only application. It is hard for me to be objective, I am a Media Composer editor before I am a Final Cut Pro editor, but I just feel the future looks brighter with a company dedicated to Television and film solutions rather than a company dedicated to mobile phones.

I would love to hear your thoughts on the matter.
Continue reading "Talking for Avid" »

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September 14, 2010
  Two days in Amsterdam
Posted By Marshall Krasser
What an incredible show! I spent 2 days wandering around the floor and was amazed by the diversity of products, ideas and technology being showcased at this great conference and city.

For myself, this was unlike any conference I have ever attended and well worth the 10-hour flight and jetlag. The city of Amsterdam is a great host and was more than welcoming, but as expected — things are a little "different." I have never passed Coffee shops in the US that were wafting out that particular "roasted coffee" smell — well except for certain shops on Haight Street in San Francisco!

As for the conference: They should have issued everyone 3D glasses upon entry, because there were 3D stereoscopic technology and displays everywhere. Seriously, everywhere except for the bathrooms, and I bet they try that next year. One could watch 3D sporting events [women's volleyball and boxing], various live camera set-ups — the Arri Booth even had a live tap dancer for their real time 3D camera demo. Some of the products were great, other were still work in progress.

The viewing conditions did play a big role in the stereoscopic success. I noticed if the displays were catching any environmental reflections, the convergence was thrown off. Well not specifically "The" convergence, but rather the lack of 3D of the reflections impeded on the stereoscopic image.

The 152-inch 4K professional monitor that Panasonic showed had me drooling. Wow! Wow! Wow! That is one sweet piece of viewing hardware. If there was a way I could have crammed it into my checked baggage, I would be so there.

Lots of LED lights being marketed, and can't wait for them to become more of the standard on sets. The power usage is minimal and the heat that is NOT generated would make the sets more enjoyable. Had a long talk with the Gekko LED group and the possibilities are endless.

The geek in me fell in love with one specific product: The Steadicam for the iPhone!!! Time to by one and make a movie. Price point is within acceptable range — in my opinion. Fun product.

The diversity of products would take a while to run down and since the lack of sleep is catching up with me. I would highly recommend planning a trip to Amsterdam for the next IBC Conference.

Cheers, Marshall
Continue reading "Two days in Amsterdam" »

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September 13, 2010
  New card offloader for digital filmmakers
Posted By Wes Plate
One problem faced by filmmakers using DSLRs and other cameras that record to memory cards is how to quickly offload the files so you can wipe the card and continue shooting. The problem is worst if you're a one-person operation, you can't shoot while you're offloading, and the offloading to a laptop can take what feels like forever. Nevermind the added bulk of the computer and drives that you're lugging around with you.

I have faced this dilemma myself, so I was curious what I might find at IBC.

Near the back of hall 11 is Nexto Di, which was showing its currently-shipping NVS2500 and a more professional and soon-to-be shipping version, the NVS2525. The NVS2525 is a small device sporting a P2 card slot as well as an SxS card slot. Inside the small enclosure is a 750GB hard drive and rechargeable battery and the front has a small display for menus and status communication.

The idea is you insert your camera's card — and BTW, CF cards are supported via a CF to Expresscard 34 adapter that fits into the SxS slot-- press a button and the system offloads the card at up to 80 MB/sec. You can even create an instant backup by attaching a portable eSATA drive to the NVS2525 and have the device automatically copy your camera's files to both the internal and external drives at the same time.

When you're done offloading and ready to move the files to your editing system there are USB, Firewire 800 and eSATA connections on the side for offloading this handy offloader.

The NVS2525 will be shipping in Q4 2010 for $2700 in a bundle that will include an external rechargeable battery and an external portable 750GB eSATA drive.
Continue reading "New card offloader for digital filmmakers" »

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September 13, 2010
  New options for field recording
Posted By Wes Plate
For while I've been interested in efficient ways to record long performances, like my daughters' dance company's two hour dance showcases. I'm always working alone so I don't have the luxury of an assistant who can help me continually swap P2 cards, offloading while I shoot. AJA's popular Ki Pro and the Convergent Design nanoFlash are well known solutions to this problem but I can't afford them for my charity projects.

Two new products shown at IBC have the budget producer in mind. AJA announced the Ki Pro Mini, a smaller version with a few less features than its larger cousin, but still packing SDI and HDMI inputs. Instead of recording to disk like the Ki Pro, the Ki Pro Mini writes its files to CF cards. And the mini has two slots, extending your recording time and also making a card swapping scenario possible. The Ki Pro Mini should be available in October for $1999.

The other device I same across is Atomos Ninja, coming soon from Atomos which was started by some ex-Blackmagic Design guys. The Atomos Ninja is a $995 field recorder that looks quite different from the other devices I've mentioned above. Featuring a 4.3 inch touchscreen display the Atomos Ninja records ProRes from an HDMI input to a standard 2.5 inch hard drive that you provide.

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This is an interesting idea since hard drives are just about as cheap as CF cards these days, but of course their capacity is much much larger, so you can record for hours and hours. The Atomos Ninja is expected to be shipping in December.
Continue reading "New options for field recording" »

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September 13, 2010
  Two days in Amsterdam
Posted By Marshall Krasser
What an incredible show! I spent 2 days wandering around the floor and was amazed by the diversity of products, ideas and technology being showcased at this great conference and city.

For myself, this was unlike any conference I have ever attended and well worth the 10-hour flight and jetlag. The city of Amsterdam is a great host and was more than welcoming, but as expected — things are a little "different." I have never passed Coffee shops in the US that were wafting out that particular "roasted coffee" smell — well except for certain shops on Haight Street in San Francisco!

As for the conference: They should have issued everyone 3D glasses upon entry, because there were 3D stereoscopic technology and displays everywhere. Seriously, everywhere except for the bathrooms, and I bet they try that next year. One could watch 3D sporting events [women's volleyball and boxing], various live camera set-ups — the Arri Booth even had a live tap dancer for their real time 3D camera demo. Some of the products were great, other were still work in progress.

The viewing conditions did play a big role in the stereoscopic success. I noticed if the displays were catching any environmental reflections, the convergence was thrown off. Well not specifically "The" convergence, but rather the lack of 3D of the reflections impeded on the stereoscopic image.

The 152-inch 4K professional monitor that Panasonic showed had me drooling. Wow! Wow! Wow! That is one sweet piece of viewing hardware. If there was a way I could have crammed it into my checked baggage, I would be so there.

Lots of LED lights being marketed, and can't wait for them to become more of the standard on sets. The power usage is minimal and the heat that is NOT generated would make the sets more enjoyable. Had a long talk with the Gekko LED group and the possibilities are endless.

The geek in me fell in love with one specific product: The Steadicam for the iPhone!!! Time to by one and make a movie. Price point is within acceptable range — in my opinion. Fun product.

The diversity of products would take a while to run down and since the lack of sleep is catching up with me. I would highly recommend planning a trip to Amsterdam for the next IBC Conference.

Cheers, Marshall
Continue reading "Two days in Amsterdam" »

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September 13, 2010
  Finding the digital needle in an exhibition haystack
Posted By Neil Evely
Next time I go to IBC I will remember the last 2 days and think carefully about how long I really need to be able to do the Exhibition justice. Arriving early Friday morning and leaving on Sunday meant I very quickly had to condense my visit and attempt to make a plan of attack. 13 halls of various technology and resellers, and I had approximately 14 hours. It seemed not unrealistic to do a quick sweep of the area, make a note of the stands and companies that caught my eye and return to them on the Saturday for more info — simple.

My first port of call was Hall 7, the Post Production Zone. This was for 2 reasons: The first being I'm Head of Ops at the Clipstone office of The Mill in London — which is only 3 months old and entirely tapeless to boot — and I’m rather proud of it. So Post seemed like a good place to start. Secondly, our sister company Beam (formerly Beam.tv) has their stand at IBC in Hall 7, which was rather exciting for all concerned and looked very smart sat in amongst other post giants like Blackmagic and Avid, eagerly demonstrating the Beam retail aspects amongst all the services that it offers.

I began to wade through the free blurb that I was handed at registration (events like this make me feel bad for trees) and attempted to draw up a bit of a hit list, but soon found myself still walking around hall 7 by the early afternoon — my great plan already failing spectacularly.

As well as generally trying to get an idea of what is new and exciting for The Mill, I very much wanted to find that one thing that would intrigue me and allow me to effortlessly blog for Post, talking fluently about its technological advances and how it will no doubt excite the creatives. It wasn't initially easy to pick the wheat from the chaff, many exhibitors I had never heard of, and I found myself making very quick decisions of whether to talk to them, based on the look and feel of their space (again, nice one Beam — you can check out images of their stand at www.beam.tv).

One such company that I perhaps would have initially passed by if it were not for the fact that it had an iPhone and iPad on demo (I'm easily swayed, I'm sorry) is Streambox. Founded in 1999 and based in Seattle, they specialise in a software based platform for live and file based video transport via IP. CNN use their software for video phone reporting for example. Their new toy is AVENIR, an advanced version of one of their standard Streamboxes, designed for video streaming and delivery via bonded 3G/4G networks. A battery powered portable unit that fits on a camera person’s waist and takes in a live HD/SDI feed which is then pushed out over IP, via 8 3G and 4G wireless cards. Through the use of dynamic bandwidth negotiation it can do real-time delivery of HD/SD and near real time file based delivery of the ACT-L3 QuickTime format. The AVENIR has 2 paths on which to transmit so can send live media to a decoder or media player as well transmit the files to a server or data centre for edit and broadcast.

As with all these live stream boxes and devices, I’d very much like to see it in action, but if it does what it says on the tin, then it has effectively rendered OB (Outdoor Broadcast) vans redundant and makes external reporting far more cost effective. From a live TV point of view, your team can now consist of a single reporter/artist and single cameraman, maybe even just the one of them? It goes without saying that cost ramifications would be considerable, however I see it possibly being used in a film or set environment. Beam was initially designed as a quick way of delivering CGI rushes back to Sir Ridley Scott as encoded files while he was filming on set in Malta for the movie "Gladiator," so why not stream the footage from set back to a post house, so they can start work immediately, even if it is rough rotoscoping or prep? It also gives 2nd units, a way of keeping up to date with multiple shoots and the individual sets could (in theory) all be streamed to one place for the editor to work up an offline edit combining all the day’s footage?

This is why I like IBC; it’s not just about the kit that is available, it’s also about what it will lead to. People far more clever than I will glue three of these companies together to create something even more impressive, and that’s when things get really interesting.
Continue reading "Finding the digital needle in an exhibition haystack" »

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September 12, 2010
  A New Unified Power Brew
Posted By Wes Plate
When Post Magazine's Randi Altman asked me to blog about IBC I was concerned about finding something cool and new to write about, because many of the show's gems are tucked away and off the beaten path, and the huge size of the expo can make them hard to find. But yesterday during a wonderful chat at The Beach with my old friend Knut Helgeland of Toxic in Oslo Norway he shared his excitement over Imagineer Systems' forthcoming mocha Pro. And I'm glad he did, because Imagineer Systems is hiding out in Hall 13 (did I mention IBC was huge?), which is a bit out of the way.

Imagineer Systems is the innovator of planar tracking, a different approach to 2D tracking that makes it possible to easily perform complex tracks that can be very difficult to achieve using other more common methods. Users of After Effects will be familiar with mocha for After Effects, a version of their popular tracking application that is bundled with Adobe After Effects. While mocha may be what introduced many users to Imagineer Systems' powerful technology, they actually had other products available long before.

Mokey is an application for automatically removing unwanted elements from moving footage such as wires and logos. Conversely monet is used for adding objects to a scene, such as screen insertion and product placement. Both products are based on the same planar tracking engine.

Inevitably some capability overlap developed between money, mokey and mocha, and in order to simplify the product offerings Imagineer Systems has introduced mocha Pro which unifies the capabilities of the three products into one updated 64-bit interface.

Among the features of the new product is the lens module, which helps compositors account for camera lens distortions when adding an element into a shot, distorting the new object to match the plate and adding realism to the effect. The Autofill feature in the Stabilize module fills in the black edges that occur when a stabilize operation moves the frame around to compensate for the motion that is being removed. Instead of the user needing to scale up the image to push the black edges offscreen, Autofill generates new contextually appropriate pixels for these areas.

Mocha Pro will be available in Q4 2010 and is expected to be $1,495 for a node locked license. Imagineer Systems has also simplified their upgrade paths for existing users interested in the new product.
Continue reading "A New Unified Power Brew" »

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September 12, 2010
  Hiding in Plain Sight
Posted By Wes Plate
To travel between halls 7 and 8 visitors walk across a skybridge that takes them over The Beach, an actual beach that is quite popular with exhibitors and attendees alike. Many people are stopping, however, to watch a beach volleyball game being played on the sand below. These oglers should go down and take a closer look, though, because the spectacle is actually a showcase of some very cool tech from Hego.

image

The first tip-off that this isn't a spontaneous match between rival gangs of beautiful Dutch girls is the large outdoor display showing a live view of the game, the kind you're likely to see in any sports arena around the world. The view switches to show serves and returns and also follows the play as the ball passes over the net.

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Mounted beside the net is a box containing the capture element of Hego's OB1 "complete sports production solution". Six fixed HD cameras are arrayed inside the box each offset from each other to produce what will be panoramic view of the playing field. The software running on the PC receiving these signals stitches the views together to create a seamless panorama, and the single operator controls the what is seen by virtual cameras.

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This separation of camera and performance reminds me of the technology James Cameron created for Avatar. The computer is recording the entire panoramic image, so if the operator of the live stream was to miss a key play they can easily produce a replay showing the action with a corrected camera view. Indeed the Hego rep I spoke with described OB1's use as a training tool, where an entire game or practice can recorded by the system and then later the coach can review each play over and over, each time focusing on a different player or position.

IBC visitors can certainly be forgiven for not appreciating what is actually being demonstrated, but I encourage you to take a closer look at what's happening just off the court. It is enough to distract from the distraction.
Continue reading "Hiding in Plain Sight" »

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September 12, 2010
  Refreshed eyes on IBC
Posted By Wes Plate
My name is Wes Plate, president and co-founder of Automatic Duck, Inc., a company that makes plug-ins for translating timelines between After Effects, Avid, Final Cut Pro and more. Though I have exhibited at IBC for several years this is the first time I am attending as a mere visitor, and so the good folks at Post Magazine invited me to share my thoughts and impressions of IBC from the vendor side.

Since we started Automatic Duck in 2001 we have exhibited at the industry's two largest trade shows: NAB in Las Vegas and IBC here in Amsterdam. Exhibiting is tremendously hard work and is not nearly as glamourous as you might think. In addition to all the planning and organizing and shipping and setting up and tearing down and shipping back, there is the main job of being accessible in your booth for many hours talking to a variety of people who range from exciting profit prospects through those who, well, aren't. While we all like to moan about how much trade shows suck, meeting customers is actually refreshing, energizing and rewarding. People come up to talk about how much they love your product, and even those who are experiencing a problem are respectful because in person it is much more difficult to be a jerk like email communication too often encourages. And I'm very nice in person.

If you've ever seen Automatic Duck at NAB or IBC you probably noticed we've been a part of a group of plug-in vendors called the Plug-in Pavilion. We team up to get a large space and then we share the various costs, it is quite a good idea and while it doesn't necessarily make exhibiting much cheaper it does allow us to get good space in the hall. I love the Plug-in Pavilion, and over the years us repeat offenders in the group have become good friends. However since our group started exhibiting at IBC fewer and fewer plug-in companies have participated. Last year when there were only two of us left sharing the space and the costs, we looked at each other and decided it was getting too expensive. But because I love IBC and I love Amsterdam, I still came out. After seven years of exhibiting at IBC this is the first year I'm just a visitor.

There is a lot to like about IBC. Amsterdam is a fantastic city full of beauty and kindness, with loads of fantastic restaurants and places to visit with friends. And for me this aspect of IBC is important. Many of us vendors get to know each other as we see our same exhausted faces year after year at NAB, IBC and other industry events. At IBC we seem to have more of an opportunity to get together in the evening, something that no one is able to do at NAB because of all the events, user meetings, parties and other working-while-drinking occasions. But here in Amsterdam I feel like we get to relax a little after the exhibits close for the day.

We can even relax and socialize at the show itself, if you can get away from your booth (or just forego the booth altogether). It turns out located on the grounds of the RAI exhibition center is the Strand Zuid City Beach, a lovely outdoor area with two restaurants, beer, sand, benches and chairs that all work together to nearly make you believe you're not on the clock.

Naturally there is work to be done at IBC, otherwise our bosses wouldn't be sending us, and IBC is fantastic place to do business. As you join the queue to enter the building you immediately sense that you're amongst professionals, just about everyone is wearing a suit. And not in a stuffy wearing-a-suit-at-NAB way, but in a cool European way that exudes power and style, with a dash of you can tell these dudes also know how to party. Many of the visitors to IBC are power players in large broadcasting companies, there to get questions answered and potentially make deals. In my experience visitors will stay at a stand a lot longer than they will at other shows, asking very thoughtful questions and won't leave until their understanding is crystal clear. But the slowness isn't a problem, there aren't crushing crowds here, rather a crop of high value prospects. No tire kickers.

This visit has so far been again quite positive. I've enjoyed successful meetings at the beach, memorable dinners with friends and business partners, plus loads of good and insightful chat all around IBC. I will leave Amsterdam reinvigorated and excited about the opportunities that lie ahead.
Continue reading "Refreshed eyes on IBC" »

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September 10, 2010
  IBC Day 1
Posted By Randi Altman
Some cool stuff happening here at IBC in Amsterdam. Last night Omneon and Harmonic held their first ever combined press event. The deal for Harmonic to buy Omneon is still not complete, but it should be finalized shortly. The two companies emphasized how by working together they can provide an end to end infrastructure that involves direct ingest of live feeds into Omneon's MediaGrid. A new Omneon product discussed was the ProXchange 1.6, which supports ProRes 4:2:2.

Today Quantel talked about how — for the post part of their biz — 3D stereo has now overtaken 2D in terms of sales. They also announced that Cinnafilm's Dark Energy noise reduction technology is available for its iQ, eQ and Pablo products.

AJA has three new offerings in each of the product categories they server. Acquisition: a new KiPro Mini ($1,995) that weighs one pound and offers a scaled down version of its big brother the KiPro. For editing, there is the next-gen Kona card, the Kona 3G ($1,995), which offers HDMI 1.4a output for stereographic monitoring to consumer 3D displays, among other new offerings, including 10-bit uncompressed video 3G/HD/SD SDI I/O. For conversions, AJA introduced the Hi5-3D mini converter ($495) featuring the new HDMI 1.4a output.

Ok, have to run. More to come...
Continue reading "IBC Day 1" »

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