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AUDIOMACHINE TRACKS POPULAR IN TRAILERS

Marc Loftus
March 8, 2007
AUDIOMACHINE TRACKS POPULAR IN TRAILERS

Carol Sovinski is a partner at Audiomachine with Paul Dinletir and says that while most of the company's revenue is come from licensing, the studio also offers custom scoring capabilities should clients request them.

"It seems like we will get asked to contribute something original to a new trailer after the music supervisor has listened to everything he or she has available and [has] still not found the 'right fit," says Sovinski. "Our ultimate goal is to produce compositions that anticipate what a music supervisor will need before they get to the point of calling music libraries for additional material."

Audiomachine released "Trailer Acts" late last summer. The collection is broken down beyond categories and themes to include also three different movements, or acts.

"Act I contains compositions tailored for the opening segment of a trailer, while Act II contains 'main body' compositions, and Act III provides the big, climactic finishes," Sovinski explains. Tracks from the library have been used in trailers for The Prestige, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, The Kingdom, The Reaping, The Good Shepherd and Rescue Dawn.      

Audiomachine is currently working on "The Platinum Series I," a collection that will feature big, cinematic, orchestral themes for motion picture advertising campaigns. The project has been in the works for 18 months and will feature 41 new compositions recorded by a 100-piece orchestra and 40-voice choir, triple tracked to deliver a high-end experience. All of the cues will contain modulations, builds, hits, starts and stops, making them easy for editors to cut to. Most of the compositions will also include choir, non-choir and drums-only versions.

Audiomachine uses a non-exclusive licensing model. Other libraries offered by the company include "Atomic Music Station," "Tools of the Trade" and "Big, Big and Bigger."