Advertisement
Current Issue
September 2014
Issue: February 1, 2010

CONSULTING BENEFITS

By: Marc Loftus
Post studios have long realized the benefits of working with freelance talent. They can bring in creatives based on the job, and not have to lay off when things slow down. But what about those serving in non-creative roles, such as business strategists?

Jeff Ross recently launched Pedal Faster Business Consulting (www.pedalfaster.com), a company offering strategic planning, marketing, and cost tracking and analysis. His career includes executive posts at Eden FX, Pacific Ocean Post and POP Film, but he’s since decided to go out on his own, offering consulting services to small and mid-size companies in the VFX and post facility arena that are growing or looking to expand their client base. As an outsider, Ross feels he can provide a clear perspective to studio owners.

“They don’t really want to hire another person, but they do want someone who can work with their staff and guide them to see what other markets they can get into,” says Ross.
As a consultant, he sets up a structure that allows owners to get back into the creative aspect of the business — something they often lose a handle on when running a growing company. “It gives them the structure that allows the company to grow and function most efficiently and effectively.”

Marty Shindler (www.ishindler.com) is a long-time consultant whose career includes time with the CPA firm Coopers & Lybrand, as well as roles with Fox, MGM, ILM and Cinesite.
“I saw a lot of companies that were really good at what they did,” says Shindler of his years in the business. “People involved in various creative businesses or technology businesses, but they didn’t necessarily have their business or administrative act together. A good company requires a solid balance of creativity, technology and a strong business team, otherwise they are going to be S.O.L!”

Shindler says entrepreneurs often lack marketing and finance skills, both of which are necessary to succeed. He tells client “what they need to hear,” not “what they want to hear.” He even wrote an article about the dangers of working with staffers who are afraid to say what they think. It’s on the Post Website. CLICK HERE.